CPU Review: Intel Core i7-10750H vs i7-9750H Review

Today we take a look at what is likely to be the most popular of Intel’s 10th-generation H-series processes, the Core i7-10750H. These six-core processors are the successors to the most popular Core i7-8750H and Core i7-9750H, which are almost universal options for gaming laptops in the $ 1,000 to $ 1,800 range, and often lead the paper Ultraportables are also based on productivity focused on 15-inch.

This is not the only Core i7 processor in Intel’s Comet Lake line-up. There are several other options including the new 8-core Core i7-10875H that we reviewed a few weeks ago, but judging from previous generations, anything over 10750H will usually be withheld at premium options, while the Core i5s you see here – still amazing quad cores – are reserved for the most basic entry-level designs.

CPU Review: Intel Core i7-10750H vs i7-9750H Review
CPU Review: Intel Core i7-10750H vs i7-9750H Review

Going into this review though, there is one key question I keep asking myself: is the Core i7-10750H really better than the 9750H or the 8750H that came before it? After all, they are all based on a similar Skylake-derivative architecture, built using the same 14nm technology, and all pack 6 cores inside a default 45W power envelope. Without any major improvements to the underlying technology, is it possible to offer anything before this third iteration of the processor?

No doubt, that is what we will find today with a comprehensive comparison of 10750H to 9750H and 8750H, along with a look at how it runs up to AMD’s newly minted competitors in this price range, the eight-core Ryzen 7 4800H. This review focuses on productivity performance and then we will discuss gaming in a separate article that we are preparing because there are some interesting things happening in the latest generation of GPUs as well.

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Image Credit: Intel

Going into this review though, there is one key question I keep asking myself: is the Core i7-10750H really better than the 9750H or the 8750H that came before it? After all, they are all based on a similar Skylake-derivative architecture, built using the same 14nm technology, and all pack 6 cores inside a default 45W power envelope. Without any major improvements to the underlying technology, is it possible to offer anything before this third iteration of the processor?

No doubt, that is what we will find today with a comprehensive comparison of 10750H to 9750H and 8750H, along with a look at how it runs up to AMD’s newly minted competitors in this price range, the eight-core Ryzen 7 4800H. This review focuses on productivity performance and then we will discuss gaming in a separate article that we are preparing because there are some interesting things happening in the latest generation of GPUs as well….

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Image Credit: Google

All-core turbos also rose, now to 4.3 GHz, from 4.0 GHz, however we believe it was influenced to some degree by the Thermal Velocity Boost. In practice, we’ve seen all-core turbos around the 4.1 to 4.2 GHz mark on most occasions, and long frequencies are naturally lower than that, don’t expect your 10750H CPU to sit at just 4.3 GHz in all cores at all times.

Test Setup: MSI GS66 Stealth

The test system for review today is the MSI GS66 Stealth. This amazing laptop comes packed with the i7-10750H along with an RTX 2060 discrete GPU configured at 80W. There is also 16GB of dual-channel DDR4-2666 by default (which we replaced with DDR4-2933 to make the most of the CPU), a 512GB SSD, and a 1080p 240Hz display which is pretty good.

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Test Setup: MSI GS66 Stealth

We are a huge fan of the MSI GS Stealth range. We think they look good and are no exception. We’re not going to fully review this laptop right now, but we can tell you it’s got a very nice chassis, good display, massive 99.9 Wh battery, and generally decent keyboard. It remains one of my favorite ultraportables from a design and functionality point of view.

In terms of performance and power limits, we do not get the top hardware capabilities provided by slim and light design. The CPU can easily run at the default limit of 45W, but tops around 53W maximum with Turbo modes. We saw some thicker designs of up to 70W or more. The GPU sits well at 80W though, no worries there.

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image: google

Only the CPU leading 53W in CoolerBoost mode is actually irrelevant though for this test, as we run all CPUs using stock settings, so in this case for the Core i7-10750H that’s a 45W long-term power limit of PL1. The MSI GS66 is configured to use a large 135W short term PL2 out of the box, however in practice we haven’t seen the CPU go through 70W very often. However, this is a bit higher than the 56-60W we typically see with 9750H systems.

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image: google

The reason we use stock settings and similar power limits is that we can compare processor performance to a given power level. Unlike desktops, power consumption is important for laptops: more hungry components require larger coolers and therefore larger laptops. Comparing the chips to an equivalent level of power allows us to see how they perform an equivalent type of design. The more a CPU can do within a certain power limit, the better it is, and the more you can do with a smaller, lighter design.

Source: Techspot

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